Nick Ellinger

Nick Ellinger

Nick Ellinger is the VP of marketing strategy at DonorVoice. Reach him at nellinger@thedonorvoice.com

Sidestepping the Season of Sameness

It’s nearing the end of the year, a time when we come together and celebrate family, faith and the fact that our donation could be matched two to five times, if we act now, now, now!...

Marketing Metrics for Managers

The problem with any single metric is, as either or both of Karl Pearson and Peter Drucker have said, “That which is measured, improves.” My corollary to this is, “What isn’t measured is sacrificed to improve that which is measured.”...

Successful Automation Starts With Heart

There is something inherently satisfying about setting up an automated marketing system. Whether it’s retargeting, welcome series, scheduled social updates, automated ad buys, there is a temptation to "Ron Popeil" these efforts (“Just set it, and forget it!”)...

Donor Retention: Winning the Attrition Battle

Since 2008, new donor retention rates are down 22 percent and repeat donor retention rates are down 11 percent. And let’s face it, 2008 was not a banner year for fundraising (or really anything in the economy, if you weren’t a character in “The Big Short”). So, we are either getting worse at retaining people, or lower retention is happening to us because of systemic changes...

Data Challenges: A Marketer's Guide to the Present by Way of the Past

Once upon a time, the only customized marketing available was face-to-face (the First Age). That changed when people got mail addresses (Second). Then phone numbers (Third). Then email addresses (Fourth). Each media and age started as something both completely mass market and completely individualized, with nothing in the middle...

The Death of 'X': Why 'Boring' Might Be Best for Nonprofits

Every day, it seems like there is a new, shiny thing to play with in the nonprofit space. Some of them will stand the test of time. Others will not. But rumors of the death of “X” (where “X” is direct mail, unrestricted giving, segmentation, corporate philanthropy or whatever else is tried, true and boring) are greatly exaggerated. Highly effective nonprofits are doubling down, improving on what they know works, has worked and will work, regardless of whether their stories make for great dinner party anecdotes...